After 15 concussions and friend's suicide bull rider retires from the sport

December 14, 2018, Kitchener, Ontario

Posted by: Robert Deutschmann, Personal Injury Lawyer

How many concussions is too many?

Bull riding. Most people think of the mechanical bull rides that you find at fairs or in some bars. When we think about sports Bull riding isn’t one that springs to mind for most people. It is however a highly competitive and skilled sport carries a lot of inherent risk. One rider, Matt O’Flynn has decided to reconsider his participation in the sport.

Mr. O’Flynn’s decision is based on two things – the death of a close friend, and his own 15th (fifteenth) concussion in the sport. At the age of 28 he’s decided to quit, and now he wonders what role repeated concussions payed in the suicide of his good friend and fellow rider Ty Pozzobon.  Earlier this month Mr. O’Flynn rode his last bull while thinking of of his friend who was no longer alive.

Mr. Pozzobon killed himself at the age of 25 and his mother is convinced that his depression was concussion linked.  Experts say that repeated concussions can lead to permanent brain changes. Mr. Pozzobon had everything to live for according to those who knew him. He had suffered repeated concussions although no one knows how many in his career as a bull rider. There are many videos of him on YouTube being knocked out upon falling or falling off the bull and smashing his helmet.

Experts know that rates of anxiety and depression are very high in people with post-concussion syndrome. Helmets do not prevent concussion, they merely protect the skull. For professional bull riders there is an inherent ‘toughness’ and pressure to compete among athletes. In addition to social pressures, if they don’t ride, they don’t get paid.

A post mortem of Mr. Pozzobon revealed that he had CTE (chronic traumatic encephalopathy) a brain condition found in boxers, hockey players, football players and others who suffer repeated head trauma. CTE impacts brain function causing cognitive impacts and physical deficits. It also causes personality changes and is a progressive degenerative condition that cannot be stopped.

It is likely a good think that Mr. O-Flynn has stopped competing. Let’s hope that his future is bright.

Posted under Accident Benefit News, Brain Injury, Concussion Syndrome, concussion, traumatic brain injury

View All Posts

About Deutschmann Law

Deutschmann Law serves South-Western Ontario with offices in Kitchener-Waterloo, Cambridge, Woodstock, Brantford, Stratford and Ayr. The law practice of Robert Deutschmann focuses almost exclusively in personal injury and disability insurance matters. For more information, please visit www.deutschmannlaw.com or call us toll-free at 1-866-414-4878.

It is important that you review your accident benefit file with one of our experienced personal injury / car accident lawyers to ensure that you obtain access to all your benefits which include, but are limited to, things like physiotherapy, income replacement benefits, vocational retraining and home modifications.

Practice Areas

  1. Car accidents
  2. Motorcycle accidents
  3. Automobile accident benefits
  4. Catastrophic injury
  5. Brain injury
  6. Paraplegia and Quadriplegia
  7. Spinal cord injury
  8. Drunk driving accidents
  9. Concussion syndrome
  1. Wrongful death
  2. Bicycle accidents
  3. Disability insurance claims
  4. Slip and fall injury
  5. Fractures or broken bone injury
  6. Pedestrian accidents
  7. Chronic pain
  8. Truck accidents
  9. Amputation and disfigurement

Personal Injury Blog

Jun 18, 2019
How Do We Teach "Intuition" to Autonomous Machines?
Jun 17, 2019
Courneyea v Mazzuca, 2019 ONSC 2105 (CanLII)
Jun 14, 2019
Airbnb Insurance Woes - If you are renting make sure you speak to your insurer
Jun 14, 2019
Applicant’s injuries are due to slip and fall, not a car accident - 18-004362 JD v Certas Home and Auto Insurance Company, 2019 CanLII 27898 (ON LAT)
Jun 13, 2019
What's safer -- Cycling in a Group or Single File? It depends
Jun 12, 2019
Applicant has complete inability to carry on a normal life - 18-001560 EAU v Allstate Insurance, 2019 CanLII 22201 (ON LAT)

More Personal Injury Articles » 
Review our services

Connect with us

Facebook Twitter Linkedin Youtube Google